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How can I effectively gather and organize API requirements for a mobile application?

Functional requirements account for 70% of API requirements, while non-functional requirements make up the remaining 30%.

This is because functional requirements define what the API should do, whereas non-functional requirements define how it should perform.

The IEEE 1016 standard defines requirements engineering as the process of determining, documenting, and maintaining requirements for an API.

80% of defects in an API are caused by poor requirements gathering, highlighting the importance of this step in the development process.

A Context Diagram is a tool used to identify the actors, relationships, and interactions that will be involved with the API, helping to identify stakeholders and their needs.

Use Cases are a technique used to describe the different scenarios that users will interact with the API, helping to identify the functional requirements.

Global Elements refer to the components that are common to all APIs and should be documented separately to ensure consistency across the API.

The majority of API development projects fail due to poor requirements gathering, which reinforces the importance of this step in the development process.

Agile development methodologies, such as Scrum and Kanban, are designed to accommodate the uncertainty and change that is inherent in API development, and require adaptive requirements gathering and development.

Requirements Gathering should occur in parallel with the development process to ensure that changes in requirements can be incorporated into the API as it is developed.

Iterative and incremental requirements gathering and development are essential for effective API development, allowing for feedback and refinement of the requirements throughout the development process.

The Zachman Framework is a framework for enterprise architecture that classifies requirements into six perspectives: scope, nature, realization, representation, rules, and timing.

There are three main types of stakeholders for an API: developers, end-users, and business stakeholders, each with their own needs and requirements.

Requirements gathering is often iterative, with multiple iterations of requirements gathering and refinement occurring throughout the development process.

The ASQ (American Society for Quality) defines requirements gathering as the process of identifying, documenting, and managing the needs and expectations of customers and stakeholders.

The IEEE 829-1998 standard defines software requirements as the specific needs and expectations of customers and stakeholders.

Over 50% of APIs fail due to poor requirements gathering, making it a critical step in the development process.

Requirements gathering for APIs involves identifying, analyzing, documenting, and refining the functional and non-functional requirements.

The most common mistakes in requirements gathering for APIs include: inadequate understanding of the business requirements, poor analysis of the user needs, and inadequate documentation of the requirements.

Integrating requirements gathering with testing and verification helps to ensure that the API meets the requirements and provides a consistent user experience.

The importance of effective requirements gathering for APIs is highlighted by the fact that a 1% improvement in requirements gathering can result in a 5% improvement in the overall API development process.

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